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ÉLEVEY is about uplifting one another, and putting ourselves into the world as the best digital citizens we can be. Here at ÉLEVEY, our mission is to upgrade the world, and that starts by education.

In our day to day lives, we show up as citizens – we follow rules, laws and courtesies that underpin how people interact with one another. Much like you wouldn’t break into someone’s home, steal someone’s identity, yell at a stranger in public or open someone’s mail (unless you’re looking to break the law on purpose), cybercitizenship is about being respectful and holding yourself and others accountable for actions that we take online.

We teach citizenship to children in school – social skills and cultural norms all fit under the header of citizenship. In school and at home, there are usually consequences for poor citizenship. Online, the consequences are less clear, digital identities feel replaceable and safe to hide behind.

At ÉLEVEY, we believe cybercitizenship is just as important as its irl counterpart – join us in our mission to raise awareness about leading respectful and inclusive online lives. We’ve curated relevant articles for you below – it’s a great first step on your journey to becoming a cybercitizenship ambassador.

When someone hurts or scares another person repeatedly, that behaviour is called bullying and the person who initiates the behaviour is called a bully. Bullying can take many forms, and can happen in person or online, which is called cyberbullying. Cyberbullying is about the impact of the action, not the intent of the sender – in this way, it’s possible to be an unintentional cyberbully. Cyberbullying can look like any and all of these things:

  • Sending mean, insulting or threatening text, e-mail, or instant messages
  • Posting nasty pictures or messages about others online or on social media
  • Using someone else’s username and/or profile picture to spread rumors or lies about someone
  • Stealing someone’s password and spreading rumors about someone else making it seem like that person is the Cyberbully

Resources

Cyberbullying online can have very real consequences for victims. If you, or someone you know may be a victim of cyberbullying, please check out these resources and seek help. Many of these are confidential and offer instant help channels!

The Cybersmile Foundation – their Education section has plenty of resources on a variety of topics. Participate in the annual Stop Cyberbullying Day or take advantage of multiple support services.

STOMP Out Bullying is an American organization dedicated to eradicating bullying and cyberbullying. They offer a free and confidential chat line where youth can speak with trained counselors and get help and support instantly.

END to Cyberbullying Organization is a great resource for teens and parents to learn more about cyberbullying. 

Cyberdependence (commonly referred to as cyber addiction) refers to excessive and potentially harmful use of the Internet, social media and/or video games. While most people spend about 25 hours per week on the internet, people who suffer from cyber addiction can spend significantly more time online to the point where it negatively interferes with their life. . Cyberdependence is harmful partly because it’s hard to spot in our modern world, where most of our social, educational and work activities have moved online.

Resources

Cyberdependence can take over a life and have very real consequences for mental health, relationships, school and work. Here are some organizations that offer help and solutions if you or someone you know is struggling with cyberdependence. 

Tel-Jeunes is a Canadian organization offering real-time support on a variety of cyberwellness topics, including cyberdependence. You can chat with them by phone, email or text. 

CAP is an Ontario-based resource specifically for Francophone individuals and families in Ontario. They offer parent counselling and family therapy

The Center for Internet and Technology Addiction offers a number of screening tests to help identify and understand problematic behaviours. 

Cybersecurity is the protection of data, information, computers, devices and networks, including  from malicious attacks. Cybersecurity best practices range from changing passwords often to complex IT technologies and solutions that organizations like banks and credit card companies use to protect sensitive information online. It is also about user protection, and ensuring everyone is using the internet in a safe way.

Resources

Cybersecurity practices protect your sensitive information, they ensure no one can steal your digital identity and reduce your risk of getting hacked or spammed. As more and more of our lives are digitized, it’s important to learn and practice the basics of cybersecurity. These resources are here to help!

The Center for Cyber Safety and Education is a non-profit that offers lots of resources and guidance for parents, teachers and librarians. 

Cybersmart Challenge is an Australian resource for kids that offers 3 modules on cybersecurity and can be easily adapted for classroom or home use. 

The Canadian Centre for Cybersecurity offers information and guidance on cybersecurity tips and tricks intended for an older audience. Get Cyber Safe offers more reader-friendly resources and guidance for parents on how to keep kids safe online. 

Cyberwellness is an umbrella term that refers to positive and healthy online interactions and experiences. Cyberwellness involves an awareness of common digital pitfalls and issues (like cyberbullying or cyberdependence) as well as the ability to stay safe online through cybersecurity practices and digital citizenship behaviours. Cyberwellness also includes practices around internet use – from practicing good posture and ergonomics to being mindful about mental health impacts and triggers online, staying away from content that harms you and knowing who to turn to for help and guidance. 

Resources

Cyberdependence can take over a life and have very real consequences for mental health, relationships, school and work. Here are some organizations that offer help and solutions if you or someone you know is struggling with cyberdependence. 

Cybersmile Foundation – their Education section has plenty of resources on a variety of topics.

Tel-Jeunes is a Canadian organization offering real-time support on a variety of cyberwellness topics.

The Media Literacy Council is a Singapore-based initiative with resources for adults, educators, parents, seniors and youth on a variety of cyberwellness topics.

Help123.org is another Singapore resource focused on cyberwellness.